Chrome will become a new application distribution platform for any operating system - over time

What if a browser-based application can act in a desktop computer the same way as any regular application? Typically, browser based applications stay within the browser, and are launched inside the browser, while regular applications are launched through the regular desktop menubar or file system browser. Typically these worlds don't meet, but what if they did?

Over on Google+ a senior Chrome developer has announced a test feature for Google Chrome which will do exactly that. When this feature is ready for general use by everyone, this will be HUGE.

Ra - not just the Sun God, but a mighty fine programmers editor for Chrome for editing local files

I like my Chromebook (an Acer C720) because it's lightweight, slim, the battery lasts forever, and the performance is great. It's a wonderful machine on which to browse the web, run Gmail, Google Docs, etc. But there are several things I do frequently that is keeping me using my Mac desktop computer. The potential for freedom using the Chromebook is beckoning, but these use cases keep me chained to the Mac.

JavaScript doesn't tell you the Date object is bad, here's how to figure that out before crashing your program

In JavaScript, creating a Date object from a string is real convenient ("var foo = new Date(dateString)"), but what if dateString has a bad format? How will your code know about this? The Date object doesn't have a getter to tell you the date is bad.

Viewer.js, a powerful pure-JavaScript document viewer to simplify your visitors document experience

I hate the typical user experience around viewing and distributing PDF files (or other document formats). Usually we're forced to download the file to our local computer, then view it using a separate viewer. It litters the Downloads directory with old files we've downloaded, and it's somewhat jarring to find yourself suddenly having to navigate to a separate viewer application. Further, an external viewer probably doesn't work well on a mobile device where the operating paradigm is quite different from desktop computers.

First world problems in the hotel lobby, do they mean we're unprepared for real problems?

This typical scene in a hotel lobby gives me little hope for humanity if we really have to face a significant problem:

MAN1: ... I explained to you, the price shown by the hotels.com app for a room at this very hotel is $50 a night, why do you say the price ...

CLERK: Sir, as I explained to you earlier, I don't know how the hotels.com app determines those prices. All I can tell you is what the booking computer tells me, and those rates are set by the hotel chain management. If you want a room let me know, or else I'll give it to one of these people waiting.

Apple claims environmentally moral high ground with new recycling program

Environmentally conscious owners of Apple's fine products should rejoice with today's announcement by Apple of an improved product recycling program. Apple will give out Apple Gift Card's when you turn in old Apple devices, from any era, and will recycle it in nearby recycling centers. The exact value appears to vary on the device, and such as whether the device works or not.

Static HTML website builders (AkashaCMS, etc) slashes web hosting costs to the bone

Today's web is supposedly about fancy software on both server and client, building amazingly flexible applications merging content and functionality from anywhere.  What, then, is the role of old-school HTML websites?  In particular, why am I wasting my time building AkashaCMS and not building websites with Drupal?

Stopping server overload, cleaning up the site front page, disabling comments, and general goodness

The last few days the server hosting this site was overloaded, and I finally took a look at the access log, saw a continuous stream of requests that shouldn't be occurring, and realized the "links" row of teasers on the front page needed to go away. The default links row includes one reading "Log in to post comments" but this blog doesn't allow anybody else to register for an account, and in any case comments are handled by Disqus rather than Drupal's commenting system. The link didn't need to be there at all, and the more I looked at the links row the more useless it looked.

Accidental Amazon Kindle purchases: It's easy to buy for Kindle, and hard to return

Maybe this has happened to you, you're on amazon.com and accidentally purchase a Kindle book. The way it happened for me was simple, I had entered a book name to search for it, then hit TAB (don't remember why), then hit RETURN, and next thing I knew I was on a page thanking me for making a purchase. The culprit? Me, and the design of the Amazon website.

Do 3rd party commenting systems (Disqus et al) support my community, or theirs?

It used to be that Web 2.0 was the cool new thing, and a core feature was that the audience could leave comments on websites. It's common nowadays for websites to support comments, and comment areas have become (in some cases) a war zone full of partisan bickering. It was ground-breaking the 10ish or so years ago that websites began to support 3rd party comments. Really.

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