Computers

Save money and the planet, repair/upgrade your old MacBook Pro rather than tossing it to buy a new one

"They" (Apple, and other consumer electronics companies) want you to keep buying new stuff every year. They've designed the system to come out with better-faster gizmos every year to make you believe last years new hotness is this years has-been. It keeps their profit margins up, their wallets fat, so long as you keep buying new stuff. But does it serve you in any way to stay on that treadmill, chasing the latest hot gear? Do that and you're constantly shoveling money in the direction of computer companies.

The fight over entertainment in your living room

I recently bought a Mac Mini to try installing in my living room. It's an experiment to see what having a powerful multimedia device can mean when it's taken away from the office desktop and you try to put it in the living area. It's an interesting experiment and I'll be posting some observations about it later. However I'm finding this CNET NEWS article interesting: Apple, Microsoft have designs on your living room

Responsibly disposing of old computers and other electronics

Basically any thing with a circuit board needs to be treated as hazardous waste. Yet, often they aren't. e.g. "There's a lot of stuff in a circuit board that you really don't want to ingest. Lead, mercury, cadmium and beryllium all have been shown to have harmful effects on humans." And that's not to mention the plastics in the case, etc.

Some ISP's are discriminating against 3rd party network services

Earlier I wrote about plans by BellSouth and other ISP's to discriminatorially throttle 3rd party Internet traffic. The BellSouth CEO was quoted saying, essientially, those other companies (such as Google) need to pay to use their lines. And that if those 3rd parties did not pay up, they'd throttle however much of their lines those 3rd parties can use.

Re-Introducing the Real Windows Vista at Tauquil's Blog

Microsoft has a long history of copying ideas from elsewhere. I've been watching them for years, and have yet to see them come up with an inventive idea. Oh, wait, they have a visual effect for tooltips which has them "unfurl" from top-to-bottom, that's probably a true invention by Microsoft. Okay, they've had one minor original idea. In particular they seem fond of copying ideas from Apple -- in fact, its well understood that Windows was developed because Bill Gates saw the Mac and got scared and told his people he wanted something like that.

CarChip - explore the data recorded by your car

For years car makers have been putting computerized control systems in our cars. This gives more control over how the cars function, gives service shops more data with which to diagnose problems, etc. But it isn't readily accessible to the end user, hence isn't readably usable. Or, is it?

[amazon-item:B000B9DGY2|CarChip E/X OBD II Data Logger, USB Version]

The sub-$100 computer

This has been a point of discussion rumbling around the various geek news sources. The latest is a column by John Carroll wondering about this very same idea.

An answer to the $100 PC? (Posted by John Carroll, October 13, 2005, ZDNET)

Obviously one of the problems to building a $100 computer is the cost of the parts. How much do you strip it down in order to make the cost incredibly low? But my mind right now is more interesting in "why" would one want to do this?

Review: Soul & Silicon

 Spirits in a High-Tech WorldAs I've said, I have lived in Silicon Valley for over 15 years, the whole time partaking with the peculiar life of the technology industry centered here.

Review: Weaving the Web

 The Original Design and Ultimate Destiny of the World Wide WebThis book is one mans opinion of the purpose of the Web and its future.

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